Discovering the Cosmic Void

 
What do you see when you look at the sky? What lies beyond the endless blue? And what does it take, to unravel all the tales and mysteries that are held within? Sakshi Parikh speaks to 13 photographers who have dared to capture the wonders of space, both visible and invisible.
Photograph/Daniel Fernandez Caxete

Photograph/Daniel Fernandez Caxete

Daniel Fernández Caxete A fascination with the night sky from his childhood days led Daniel to spend over fi ve years (after he switched to digital) in tracking the night skies, and particularly, the International Space Station transits.

Daniel Fernández Caxete A fascination with the night sky from his childhood days led Daniel to spend over fi ve years (after he switched to digital) in tracking the night skies, and particularly, the International Space Station transits.

“The International Space Station (ISS) takes a mere half a second to cross the solar or lunar disk. Photographing it usually involves travelling hundreds of miles and often, several failed attempts.”

The greatest joy of looking through a telescope, for me, is in the fleeting moment, like the ISS passing by, which is best visible when lit by the sun over the horizon. This shot was my 30th attempt, and the moon was highest in the sky, making the station appear larger, and much closer.

Daniel’s Tip

Why Multiple Photos Help

Usually, astrophotos may need you to stack several long exposures, but while shooting pictures like these, you would want to use the Burst mode instead, considering how quickly celestial bodies and space stations move.

(Story continues on the next page.)
Tags: Albert Dros, Alexandra HArt, astrophotography, Daniel Fernandez Caxete, Fred Herrmann, Galaxies, Ignacio Diaz Babillo, Julie Fletcher, Luc Jamet, Martin Cohen, Paolo Porcellana, Robert Gendler, Rolf Wahl Olsen, space, Tanja Schmitz, Teoh Hui Chieh