Long Exposures by the Waterside

 
Pay close attention to how you can use the light to complement your overall composition. Photograph/Sarang Naik

Pay close attention to how you can use the light to complement your overall composition. Photograph/Sarang NaikĀ 

Find a Point of Interest
When creating a waterscape with a slow shutterspeed, look for a marker that the water can flow around. It could be a rock or even a branch dipping into the water.

How Slow Should You Go?
The flow of water appears differently and different shutterspeeds. The slower the shutterspeed, the smoother the water will look. Observe the water current to gauge how smooth a particular stretch with a slow shutterspeed will look. Depending on how you compose the image, you will lead the eyes of your viewer.

In certain cases, the success of long exposure images largely depends on the nature of the stationary object in the frame. Here, both the rocks combined look like a menacing crocodile. Photograph/Sarang Naik

In certain cases, the success of long exposure images largely depends on the nature of the stationary object in the frame. Here, both the rocks combined look like a menacing crocodile.
Photograph/Sarang Naik

A Calmer State of Mind
There is something about being near a water body that calms down human beings. Embrace this feeling, tap deeper into yourself and photograph as you feel. A slow shutterspeed and flowing water make for exceptionally dreamy photographs.

Any waterside provides the ideal place to find people lost in their own thoughts. A long exposure, in this case, can set the mood of the image. Photograph/Ramasubramaniyan Krishnamoorthy

Any waterside provides the ideal place to find people lost in their own thoughts. A long exposure, in this case, can set the mood of the image.
Photograph/Ramasubramaniyan Krishnamoorthy

Tags: Features, long exposure, shutterspeed, Teachnique, tips, Waterside