Floating Dimensions

 
The Abyss: This image is a beautiful portrayal of things not usually visible to us. Photograph/Nayan Mipun

The Abyss: This image is a beautiful portrayal of things not usually visible to us. Photograph/Nayan Mipun

Nayan Mipun captures the light reflected from spilled liquids through a series of well-thought out experiments.

My Assignment

  • Description: To capture light reflected from liquids.
  • Duration: Six years of planning and shooting.
  • Notes: It is important to be innovative and think outside the box, if you wish to create great art.

There are many kinds of visibilities in the world. An artist has a psychological eye and views things around him or her differently. Unlike other people, capturing of beauty is the primary motive that drives every artist. Focal lengths, shutterspeeds, light, angles… I use all of these in my quest to delight the viewer by capturing what cannot be seen by the naked eye.

Intersection: This image represents the coming together of various forms, off their own accord. Photograph/Nayan Mipun

Intersection: This image represents the coming together of various forms, off their own accord. Photograph/Nayan Mipun

My Perspective
I wanted to make Floating Dimensions a unique body of work in the world of photography. I refer to it as a kind of art movement. In today’s world, where everyone is trying to imitate what others have done, this, I believe, is a new form of making photos. Unlike other images, these photographs can not be repeated anymore because of the complex interaction between the light, subject and camera.

The Process
At the onset, I want to mention that none of these images have been digitally manipulated. They are essentially paintings with light.

I shot these photographs by capturing reflected light from spilled water in my bathroom, with the tungsten bulb being roughly nine feet above the ground. In fact, in most cases—the only source of light were the rays of the sun and a solitary tungsten lamp inside my bathroom. In addition, I used the widest aperture because the amount of light was low.

Afterwards, I took a step back from the water and waited for the reflected light to take a form of its own. The shapes and forms being reflected varied from time to time. They depended on the contours of the surfaces where the water was spilled. In retrospect, I can say that it is only after a certain amount of practice that one is able to capture the exact shapes as desired.

I handheld the camera during the entire series. As a result, I could easily move around in all directions and capture the various shapes and angles of the emerging light forms. I hope my work can make others see photography in a brand new way!

Circle Of Genesis: This image makes me think of the first cells that were formed on earth...because we are the decedents of these early life forms. Photograph/Nayan Mipun

Circle Of Genesis: This image makes me think of the first cells that were formed on earth…because we are the decedents of these early life forms. Photograph/Nayan Mipun

My Equipment
I used a Nikon D80 along with the kit lens for the entire series. I did not use any additional lights or tripods. All the images were captured using the light of a tungsten lamp in my bathroom, with an aperture of f/5.6.

How to Create Your Own Floating Dimensions

  • Do Not be Afraid to Experiment: It was the combination of my ability to take risks, and the desrie to create radical art that resulted in the birth of the Floating Dimensions series. Thus, explore and experiment with your photographs and capture the world in new and mysterious ways.
  • Push the Medium to the Fullest: As an artist, you must actualise the maximum potential of the medium you chose to work with. And as a photographer, you can use various tools and methods to create new art forms that expand the traditional way of doing things. It always helps to think outside the box!
  • Be Authentic: Another very important aspect to keep in mind is to refrain from manipulating your images digitally. None of these photographs have been tampered with in postprocessing. As a result, the viewer will not only appreciate the aesthetic quality of your images, but also admire their originality.

To see Nayan’s other work, you can visit www.flickr.com/photos/paintingphotography

Tags: abstract photography, nayan mipun, october 2012, On Assignment

  • http://www.soumennath.com Soumen Nath

    Awesome creations with water and reflections. Each one is so creative.