13 Award Winning Photographers on Framing a Slice of Life

 
Photograph/Yvon Buchmann

Photograph/Yvon Buchmann

Yvon Buchmann takes inspiration from masters of photography like Robert Doisneau, Édouard Boubat, Henri Cartier-Bresson and others. He is the recipient of the 2015 Sony WPO National Award, and has even won the fourth prize in HIPA’s General category.

Yvon Buchmann takes inspiration from masters of photography like Robert Doisneau, Édouard Boubat, Henri Cartier-Bresson and others. He is the recipient of the 2015 Sony WPO National Award, and has even won the fourth prize in HIPA’s General category.

“This photograph is a depiction of how man often finds himself in the middle of conflicting scenarios.”

I shot this image in a small French town called Bolliwer. The photograph in fact, is part of a series that I previously worked on titled Passing Time. With the help of my son, I composed the image in a way that it symbolised the fleetingness of time, and how it waits for no one.

Yvon’s Tip
Leading the Viewer’s Eyes
Incorporating lines is another way to create a compositionally strong photograph. Lines help to generate different moods in the viewer too. It nudges them to linger longer on the image, as it gives their eyes a sense of direction.

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